Home Daily Blitz Senate Passes Bill Allowing Sept. 11 Victims To Sue Saudi Arabia
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Senate Passes Bill Allowing Sept. 11 Victims To Sue Saudi Arabia

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An American flag flies near the base of the destroyed World Trade Center in New York, in this file photo from September 11, 2001, taken after the collapse of the towers. This year's anniversary of the September 11 attacks in New York and Washington will echo the first one, with silence for the moments the planes struck and when the buildings fell, and the reading of 2,792 victims' names. REUTERS/Peter Morgan-Files HB - RTR2G0E
An American flag flies near the base of the destroyed World Trade
Center in New York, in this file photo from September 11, 2001, taken
after the collapse of the towers. This year's anniversary of the
September 11 attacks in New York and Washington will echo the first
one, with silence for the moments the planes struck and when the
buildings fell, and the reading of 2,792 victims' names. REUTERS/Peter
Morgan-Files
HB - RTR2G0E

The following is an excerpt from PATRICIA ZENGERLE | May 17, 2016 | reuters.com |

The U.S. Senate passed legislation on Tuesday that would allow victims of the Sept. 11 attacks to file lawsuits seeking damages from Saudi Arabia, setting up a potential showdown with the White House, which has threatened a veto.

The Saudis, who deny responsibility for the 2001 attacks, strongly object to the bill and have threatened to sell up to $750 billion in U.S. securities and other American assets in retaliation if it becomes law.

The "Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act," or JASTA, passed the Senate by unanimous voice vote. It must next be taken up by the U.S. House of Representatives, where no vote has yet been scheduled.

If it became law, JASTA would remove the sovereign immunity, preventing lawsuits against governments, for countries found to be involved in terrorist attacks on U.S. soil. It would allow survivors of the attacks, and relatives of those killed in the attacks, to seek damages from other countries.

For more visit: reuters.com

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