Home Daily Blitz The State of Terror Defenses in the U.S.
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The State of Terror Defenses in the U.S.

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NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 16: New York City Police officers await the announcement, by New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York Police Department Commissioner William Bratton, of the formation of the NYPD Critical Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau on Randall's Island November 16, 2015 in New York City. Following the announcement was the first deployment of the NYPDÕs new Critical Response Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau trained to respond to terrorist threats like the most recent attack in Paris. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 16: New York City Police officers await the announcement, by New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York Police Department Commissioner William Bratton, of the formation of the NYPD Critical Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau on Randall's Island November 16, 2015 in New York City. Following the announcement was the first deployment of the NYPDÕs new Critical Response Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau trained to respond to terrorist threats like the most recent attack in Paris.
(Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)

The following is an excerpt from Josh Sanburn and Justin Worland | November 18, 2015 | Time.com |

Terrorist attacks in Paris that killed 129 people last week shocked the world and raised vigilance for a potential attack on U.S. soil.

A soccer stadium was evacuated in Germany Tuesday. Counterterrorism experts were dispatched across New York City. Members of Congress called for changes to the Transportation Security Administration. “There’s a much greater awareness,” says Mark J. Sullivan, former U.S. Secret Service director.

The risk of becoming a victim of terrorism is in fact extremely low; the odds of dying in a terrorist attack in the U.S. from 2007 to 2011 were one in 20 million, according to Richard Barrett, a former British intelligence officer now with the Soufan Group, which provides security services to governments and multinationals. Most domestic terrorist attacks in recent years have been the work of lone wolves acting without marching orders from organizations overseas. The chances of dying from non-terrorist related gun violence, car accidents or a drug overdose are many times higher than from foreign or domestic extremists.

For more visit: Time.com

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